Who Will Be the Andy Warhol of Big Data?

I wanted to challenge myself this year in making a highly bold prediction that could, somehow, be more singularly unique than last year’s prediction about something that was at that time so obscure as APIs. So here it is — Big Data will find its Andy Warhol.

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You don’t have to be an art lover to know a Warhol on site, or to rattle off the famous pieces of work like the campbell’s soup can or the screen paintings of Marilyn or Mao. Warhol very eloquently found and communicated transcendent meaning in the most banal of objects and images. This sustainable resonance that spread around the world is Warhol’s legacy.

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Many people are familiar with Michael Jordan’s basketball career. It was his grace and fluidity combined with his dominance that entranced so many people around the world. Jordan and Warhol were kindred spirits spread across time and domain. Warhol made the most mundane objects and images interesting to people outside the art world. Jordan made basketball relevant and meaningful to a global population that did not have any real regard for the sport. Whether it was his last season with the Bulls or his Dream Team performances in the olympics, the tickets to see him fly to the rim were the objects of desire around the world.

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Warhol did not invent Pop Art. Jordan did not invent the slam dunk. Gates did not invent personal computing. Jobs did not invent UX design. What they all have in common is that they took their banal domains so far into the territory of greatness that they made them not only matter to people, they made them matter to society at large.

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If data is boring to the general public, big data is soul crushingly boring. Big data is the ultimate tsunami of banality. Petabytes upon petabytes of numbers, words, clicks, paths and URLs. You want mundane? Big data is mundane on an unimaginable scale. The data stores are so vast, that they beg the quintessential question of our day: What does it all mean? 

This is the prediction. The Warhol of Big Data will arrive.

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Who will get the ‘Everyman’, the ‘ordinary Joe’, to see and recognize the value of Big Data to me, to you, to herself, to society?

Who Will Be the Andy Warhol of Big Data?

Via: CMSWire