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The Humbling Effect of Big Data

Looking at data with open eyes means that we may not like what we see, nor what that data will tell us.

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To me, Big Data is not all about technology. Far from it. I’d argue that there’s a human element in all new technologies, and Big Data is no exception to this rule. There’s an organizational readiness component to it, as well as a personal one. Will people and organizations unaccustomed to consulting the data suddenly change their behavior? Will they be open-minded? Or will they act as if they know how things have worked, work now, and will work in the future.

Are we ready for this?

The Humbling Effect of Big Data

Via: SmartData Collective

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The Big Data Myth

[…] When you normally deal with datasets with a hundred records, any dataset with a thousand records is overwhelming and paralyzing. And when you normally deal with datasets with a thousand records and now you’ve been asked to work with a dataset with a million records, that volume of data is overwhelming. It’s not the size of the data that makes it big data, it’s your experience with that size of data that makes it big data.

So really, big data is a myth. There are simply datasets that are larger than what you are used to working with and that you don’t yet have sufficient experience or tools to work with. It doesn’t deserve a new name. It deserves time and patience to gain a new sense of comfort and learn the  tools that other people have already been using for a lon time. Nothing more.

Big data? No such thing.

I’ve been saying the same thing as above, perhaps not as eloquently, for years now.

“Big”, when speaking of data, is relative depending on ones experience and the tools at hand.

The Big Data Myth

Via: SmartData Collective